Home of the Bluestocking Belles

Because history is fun and love is worth working for

Category: Ask Aunt Augusta (Page 1 of 3)

A Curse Only Love Can Break

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

By the king’s edict, I recently wedded a knight who’s bent on founding a dynasty. I denied his right to the marriage bed, for my life depended on it. You see, I live under the Ravenwood curse, which claimed my own dear mother and every lady in our line within memory. The curse is clear: unless a Ravenwood heir is conceived in love, the mother will die in childbirth. My husband was furious when I refused him! He thinks the curse is codswallop. For the past few days, he’s done his level best to seduce me. He’s devilishly handsome and hard to resist. I’m also starting to care about him, but I doubt he could ever love me. He’s a hard man. He’s had to be. ‘Tis an impossible situation. I must either protect my virginity or teach him to love. At the moment, both seem hopeless. What would you advise?

Praying for a miracle,

Lady Ravenwood

From the heroine in Flight of the Raven, Book One of The Novels of Ravenwood by Judith Sterling

Dearest Lady Most Torn,

My dear, I am so dreadfully sorry that your line has been cursed and that you had to grow up without a mother! How dreadfully tragic.

Even more tragic is how cruel your husband is that he thinks so lowly of the curse, but a husband does have certain expectations and wants, not that yours should be ignored, of course.

I know it seems impossible, my dear, but you must–you must!–do all you can to ensure that you fall in love with your husband and find a way for him to fall in love with you in return. Believe me. A marriage based on love is a wonderful thing.

Do keep in mind that your striving for love on both accounts should not solely be because of the curse, but I do not fear that is the case because it sounds as if you have already started to fall in love with him. Love is powerful indeed, powerful enough to break any curse!

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

Flight of the Raven, Book One of The Novels of Ravenwood by Judith Sterling

How eager would the bridegroom be if he knew he could never bed the bride?

Lady Emma of Ravenwood Keep is prepared to give Sir William l’Orage land, wealth, and her hand in marriage. But her virginity? Not unless he loves her. The curse that claimed her mother is clear: unless a Ravenwood heir is conceived in love, the mother will die in childbirth. Emma is determined to dodge the curse. Then William arrives, brandishing raw sensuality which dares her to explore her own.

William the Storm isn’t a man to be gainsaid. He’ll give her protection, loyalty, and as much tenderness as he can muster. But malignant memories quell the mere thought of love. To him, the curse is codswallop. He plans a seduction to breach Emma’s fears and raze her objections. What follows is a test of wills and an affirmation of the power of love.

Judith Sterling’s Website

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

A Tempting Rake

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I fear I am in a dreadful quandary. I have fallen for a rakish sort of gentleman, one with a fair countenance and fine form. While he shows interest, he does not wish to marry. He has even, dare I say it, kissed me. I know my heart will mend in time, but should I hold onto my last vestiges of hope? Maybe, just maybe, he will change his mind. My cousin thinks I should pursue an older earl, but I do not love him, and cannot help dwelling on my unrequited love. Oh, what ever should I do?

Sincerely,

A lady most torn

From the heroine in To Tempt a Viscount by Naomi Boom

Dearest Lady Most Torn,

My dear, I know all there is to know about rakes. You see, they are rather good at knowing just what to whisper in ears and how to tempt us and even, yes, steal kisses. Many a lady has lost her heart to many a rake.

But a lady is bound to marry. I do not blame you for not wishing to pursue an older earl whom you do not love; however, perhaps it would be better for you to not pursue either man, but to let them come to you. Oftentimes, rakes require attention, and if you do not grant him it, there is a chance he will see you in a different light and will come to realize just how much he misses you. Of course, this is a gamble, and your heart is what is at stake, so only you can know for certain if you should ignore the rake, if you should peruse him, or if you should follow your cousin’s advice.

If I were you, I think I would give the rake perhaps one more chance. Hope, and love, do not ever wish to quit.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

To Tempt a Viscount by Naomi Boom

Lady Laura Rosing knows two things: first, she will marry for love, and second, she detests rakes. When she meets Lord Gavin Farris, she understands immediately that he fails both her criteria, and worse yet, he is an absolute cad who refuses to leave her be.

Lord Farris has always appreciated women and cannot understand why Lady Laura is so resistant to his charms. While pretty, she is not his usual type, but something about her intrigues him. Much to his chagrin, he finds himself desperately in love with her, but he may be too late. His adamant refusal to marry just might have planted her firmly in the arms of another.

Naomi Boom’s Website

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

Lonely Widow Looking for Love

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am in a most unusual quandary. Recently I fell into a handsome stranger’s arms while attending a masquerade ball at Vauxhall Gardens. To say that I had a sudden attraction to this man is an understatement. But, alas, when I did the unthinkable to steal a few moments in the garden with him, he thought the worst of me and actually assumed I would be amicable to spending the night with him. I, of course, refused, and yet I cannot help but constantly think of what might have been if only I had said yes. What am I to do?

Signed,

A lonely widow

From the heroine in A Kiss for Charity in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Sherry Ewing

Dearest Lonely Widow,

My dear, I know all there is to know about being a lonely widow. I must say, meeting a man by falling into his arms is a rather thrilling introduction! That he swept you off your feet like so is no small wonder. Alas, men do tend to see hidden meanings and motives in our every action, and I am not shocked to hear that he thought you wanted more than you were actually willing to give. Also, men do tend to think they can take more liberties at a masquerade ball than on other occasions, as I am sure you are aware.

Perhaps if the two of you are to cross paths again, you might give him a chance to return to your good graces, given that you cannot help but think of him. He obviously made an impression on you, and not wholly in the negative either.

Men can make mistakes, yes, that is well known, but if you can find it in yourself to give him a chance to do better, perhaps you will be well pleased with his effort. I do hope that is to be the case.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

A Kiss for Charity in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Sherry Ewing

Young widow Grace, Lady de Courtenay, has no idea how a close encounter with a rake at a masquerade would make her yearn for love again. Can she learn to forgive Lord Nicholas Lacey and set aside their differences to let love into her heart?

http://www.sherryewing.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

Marrying a Stranger

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am engaged to marry a man I hardly know. He is kind, soft-spoken, and very handsome, but I sense he is troubled. I know he has had a great deal of tragedy in his past, and I do not think I should ask him about it should it dredge up painful memories. Nevertheless, he seems to be quite secretive, and I am rather curious about the man I am to marry. How can I become acquainted with him if he will not speak candidly with me?

With gratitude,

Persephone

From the heroine in Artemis in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Jessica Cale

Dearest Persephone,

My dear, you say you are engaged to a man you hardly know, which makes me question how much it is that he knows about you. Marriage is not an institution to be entered lightly, and if you two are to spend the rest of your lives together, I am sure that any secrets he houses, and any you might be as well, are certain to come to light eventually. If you wish to learn more about him, perhaps you should first allow him to learn more about you.

Also, if you were to befriend him first, that might also help you in your endeavors. It is much easier to share secrets and open up concerning past hurts when talking to a friend than to a stranger.

Good luck, my dear. Friendship can one day perhaps transform into love, and perhaps you can help him move on past his tragedy. I do hope that to be the case.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

Artemis in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Jessica Cale

Actress Charlotte Halfpenny is in trouble. Pregnant, abandoned by her lover, and out of a job, Charlotte faces eviction two weeks before Christmas. When the reclusive Earl of Somerton makes her an outrageous offer, she has no choice but to accept. Could he be the man of her dreams, or is the nightmare just beginning?

http://www.authorjessicacale.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

An Unreasonable Father…

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

My father is unreasonable! I’ve been living with my aunt’s family since my mother died almost two years ago. I’ve only seen him a handful of times since then, and I figured he didn’t want to be bothered with me. In any case, he’s a solicitor who is never home. I really didn’t mind, because my aunt and uncle are kind and I love their children as though they are my own younger siblings. So now they are going to live a fabulous life in St. Petersburg and asked me to accompany them, but my father says no. Why should I have to stay at home when I could be dancing with princes in Russia? I AM the granddaughter of a French comte, you know. It’s not fair that I have to die of boredom in St. Albans just because my father is so provincial. Please, Aunt Augusta, can you not help me persuade him to allow me to go? If my mother were alive, SHE would certainly do so. But since she is dead, I must depend on you to do it.

Signed,

Granddaughter of a French comte, a heroine in Valuing Vanessa of Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Susana Ellis

Dearest Granddaughter of a French comte,

My dear, I am so sorry for the loss of your mother. It is always so very tragic when a child loses a parents, and for that, I wish I could give you a hug and a large cup of tea and some biscuits.

I am also sorry that you have not had the chance to spend much time with your father. Do you think it possible that your father might wish to right the wrong he has done you? That he does not seek to destroy your happiness, but to create happiness with you? Men can be a little slow at times to realize when they have wronged up. Not all endeavor to correct their past mistakes, and if he is being forthright and seeking your attentions and trying to make you happy, than perhaps you can forgive him.

If that does not prove to be the case, however, then you have my permission to show him this–that I, Aunt Augusta, ask him to be truthful with himself as to why he will not allow you to go.

But, granddaughter, I also ask you to be truthful to yourself when trying to uncover your father’s motives.

I wish you the very best, and that you may find a charming dancing partner soon, whether or not he be a Russian prince,

Aunt Augusta

Valuing Vanessa of Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Susana Ellis

Facing a dim future as a spinster under her mother’s thumb, Vanessa Sedgely makes a practical decision to attach an amiable gentleman who will not try to rule her life. The last thing widower George Durand thinks he wants is another wife, but his difficult daughter is proving difficult to handle. In any case, the admirable Miss Sedgely is far too young for him. A love match is not even a remote consideration for these two. Or is it?

http://www.susanaellis.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

Page 1 of 3

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén