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Category: Ask Aunt Augusta (Page 2 of 3)

Marrying a Stranger

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am engaged to marry a man I hardly know. He is kind, soft-spoken, and very handsome, but I sense he is troubled. I know he has had a great deal of tragedy in his past, and I do not think I should ask him about it should it dredge up painful memories. Nevertheless, he seems to be quite secretive, and I am rather curious about the man I am to marry. How can I become acquainted with him if he will not speak candidly with me?

With gratitude,

Persephone

From the heroine in Artemis in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Jessica Cale

Dearest Persephone,

My dear, you say you are engaged to a man you hardly know, which makes me question how much it is that he knows about you. Marriage is not an institution to be entered lightly, and if you two are to spend the rest of your lives together, I am sure that any secrets he houses, and any you might be as well, are certain to come to light eventually. If you wish to learn more about him, perhaps you should first allow him to learn more about you.

Also, if you were to befriend him first, that might also help you in your endeavors. It is much easier to share secrets and open up concerning past hurts when talking to a friend than to a stranger.

Good luck, my dear. Friendship can one day perhaps transform into love, and perhaps you can help him move on past his tragedy. I do hope that to be the case.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

Artemis in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Jessica Cale

Actress Charlotte Halfpenny is in trouble. Pregnant, abandoned by her lover, and out of a job, Charlotte faces eviction two weeks before Christmas. When the reclusive Earl of Somerton makes her an outrageous offer, she has no choice but to accept. Could he be the man of her dreams, or is the nightmare just beginning?

http://www.authorjessicacale.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

An Unreasonable Father…

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

My father is unreasonable! I’ve been living with my aunt’s family since my mother died almost two years ago. I’ve only seen him a handful of times since then, and I figured he didn’t want to be bothered with me. In any case, he’s a solicitor who is never home. I really didn’t mind, because my aunt and uncle are kind and I love their children as though they are my own younger siblings. So now they are going to live a fabulous life in St. Petersburg and asked me to accompany them, but my father says no. Why should I have to stay at home when I could be dancing with princes in Russia? I AM the granddaughter of a French comte, you know. It’s not fair that I have to die of boredom in St. Albans just because my father is so provincial. Please, Aunt Augusta, can you not help me persuade him to allow me to go? If my mother were alive, SHE would certainly do so. But since she is dead, I must depend on you to do it.

Signed,

Granddaughter of a French comte, a heroine in Valuing Vanessa of Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Susana Ellis

Dearest Granddaughter of a French comte,

My dear, I am so sorry for the loss of your mother. It is always so very tragic when a child loses a parents, and for that, I wish I could give you a hug and a large cup of tea and some biscuits.

I am also sorry that you have not had the chance to spend much time with your father. Do you think it possible that your father might wish to right the wrong he has done you? That he does not seek to destroy your happiness, but to create happiness with you? Men can be a little slow at times to realize when they have wronged up. Not all endeavor to correct their past mistakes, and if he is being forthright and seeking your attentions and trying to make you happy, than perhaps you can forgive him.

If that does not prove to be the case, however, then you have my permission to show him this–that I, Aunt Augusta, ask him to be truthful with himself as to why he will not allow you to go.

But, granddaughter, I also ask you to be truthful to yourself when trying to uncover your father’s motives.

I wish you the very best, and that you may find a charming dancing partner soon, whether or not he be a Russian prince,

Aunt Augusta

Valuing Vanessa of Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Susana Ellis

Facing a dim future as a spinster under her mother’s thumb, Vanessa Sedgely makes a practical decision to attach an amiable gentleman who will not try to rule her life. The last thing widower George Durand thinks he wants is another wife, but his difficult daughter is proving difficult to handle. In any case, the admirable Miss Sedgely is far too young for him. A love match is not even a remote consideration for these two. Or is it?

http://www.susanaellis.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

Confused in London

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am attracted to my mentor’s daughter. Worse than that, I can’t stop thinking of her. As a devout Jew, however, I need a woman who will keep a traditional home. Esther’s parents sent her to a secular girls’ school. She socializes with daughters of very high ranking men, and her father encourages it. I’m afraid she will never want to settle into the quiet home life I envision for our children. My sons will study with a rabbi, but my wife will have the teaching of our daughters. Still I can’t stop thinking about Esther Baumann. What am I to do?

Signed,

Confused in London

Adam Halevy, the hero in An Open Heart in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Caroline Warfield

Dearest Confused in London,

My dear Confused in London, I am not the least bit sorry to say that your Esther sounds like a bluestocking. A woman like that is quite unlike any other! A woman with brains is nothing to be feared. Quite the contrary–she will push you to be a better man and a better father.

It seems to me that you know or at the very least suspect this already, which is why you have penned me your letter. If you care for this Esther and wish for her to be your wife and the mother of your children, should you not want her to be happy? If you love her, and I believe you do, then it is because you appreciate her despite her differences from what you think you ought to want. Should you not wish for your daughters to be similar to the woman you love? Should you not want them to be learned? A quiet home life is well and good, but one full of love is best of all.

Fear not. Love is always worth believing in, and hope should never die. Give of yourself, free yourself, and you will be much the happier for it, I truly believe so.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

An Open Heart in Holly and Hopeful Hearts by Caroline Warfield

Adam has been sent on a dangerous mission for his cousin. When he returns when hopes to find a suitable wife, someone who understands a woman’s role, and will make a traditional home. Why is Baumann’s outspoken, independent daughter the one woman who haunts his nights?

http://www.carolinewarfield.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

Laid Siege to her Castle… and her Heart

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am in a conundrum and require your advice. I am beginning to have feelings for the very man who has laid siege to my castle. He fills my head both night and day and I canna seem to help myself. Please help me, Aunt Augusta, afore I do something horrible and reveal my true identity to a man I should consider my enemy.

Signed,

Amiria of Clan McLaren and Berwyck Castle, the heroine of If My Heart Could See You by Sherry Ewing

Dearest Amiria,

Oh, dear! Your castle is under siege? I do so hope you are quite safe behind your walls! And I do not merely mean the walls of your castle but also the walls of your heart.

I think, Amiria, that perhaps it might be best for you to endeavor to determine what it is you want and what it is that he wants. Without a doubt, you two are at odds with one another. Strangely, but it has happened to many times before for it to be ignored, people who cannot be more different find themselves becoming a match that serves rather nicely.

You do not give enough details about him for me to understand enough, but that he fills your head both night and day — that I do understand. Preoccupation of the mind like this does suggest deep feelings.

My suggestion is to tread carefully, both with your castle and with your heart. Perhaps you both need to talk in order to settle matters on both accounts.

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

If My Heart Could See You by Sherry Ewing

When you’re enemies, does love have a fighting chance?

http://www.SherryEwing.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

A Wary Widow Seeks Advice

Ask Aunt Augusta

Dear Aunt Augusta,

I am alone in a foreign country where I speak not a word of the language. I recently hired an Englishman fluent in Italian to interpret for me. He claims to be a military man but I see no evidence of it. He wears a shabby coat, is in want of a hair cut, and, I am embarrassed to say, smells of drink. He does his job, but frequently oversteps and appears to think he is my bodyguard. I fear I like him too much. Can he be trusted?

Signed,

A wary widow, the heroine of DANGEROUS SECRETS by Caroline Warfield

Dearest Wary Widow,

I commend you for being alone in a foreign country and endeavoring your best to not only survive there but to thrive. Hiring an Englishman to interpret for you is smart, and it is smart, too, I feel, for you to be wary. If a man claims to be military but you see no evidence of it, that does raise suspicions.

Then again, you mention that he appears to think he is your bodyguard. He obviously cares about you, and your safety, as do I, and I am grateful that he is there for you. It cannot be easy to be alone in a foreign country and you a widow!

You fear you like him too much. I always advise to follow one’s heart, and if you feel safe with him, your interpreter and bodyguard, maybe you can trust him.

I would suggest that you talk to him. Ask him for more details. And maybe, just maybe, you can interpret each other’s hearts.

 

I wish you the very best,

Aunt Augusta

DANGEROUS SECRETS by Caroline Warfield

Will love—and the truth—bind them both together?

http://www.carolinewarfield.com

~~~

Dear authors, if ever you should find that one of your characters has found him or herself in a rather trying position, whether in matters of the heart or matters of fashion or any matter at all, do be a kind soul and write to me. I will endeavor to answer your questions, if you but pen them for me.

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